The Hardest Part about Boondocking


Do you want to try something adventurous and soothing at the same time? Try out boondocking now!

The best way to renew the energy in you is to take a rest from the busy city life and to spend a night or two in the arms of nature.

But that’s not easy; you may have to suffer a little.

The hardest part about boondocking is to manage your power and water reserves during your stay. Finding the appropriate parking, dumping the black and gray water, getting fresh water for drinking purposes, and much more.

It’s hard only for the first time but believe me, when you try boondocking most often; it’ll become a part of your routine.

So don’t stress yourself about this.

Most of us aren’t prepared to get off of our amenities. What’s the reason? We don’t want to try out new things.

But once you know the charm of enjoying something adventurous, there’s no going back. So let’s discuss some hard parts about boondocking.

Hardships You Might Suffer During Boondocking

“Comfort comes after continuous hardships.”

The above saying is rightly fitting the scenario about boondocking. If you want to soak up the beauty of nature, you’ve to prepare yourself for some hardships first. Some of them are below.

Power Reserves

An RV home is equipped with all those appliances which need the power to serve you. The lights, the fans, the furnace, the AC, and even the oven need some electricity to run.

Because you’re going away from all kinds of normal power reserves, this will test you a lot.

But as we know, every problem comes with a solution, so make sure that you have an inverter with you to cope with this problem.

Your inverter is a power electronic device that will change the direct current (DC) to alternating current (AC)

Here’s another problem popping up! The inverter needs immense electric power, so you need a large battery bank if you plan on using bigger appliances. Things like a microwave, or a coffee pot, curling iron, or blow dryer.

If you plan on running any big appliances or your Air Conditioner you might think about a generator. Here are a few good ones on AmazonOpens in a new tab..

Finding the Right Parking

Well, parking your RV in downtown or near the city seems useless and head-scratching.

Don’t you want to live a few moments in peace, just away from the hectic everyday routine? So why choose downtown or places in nearby cities? There’s no fruit of boondocking in this sense.

If you want to feel nature in all ways, try to look for the large areas between forests, or ask a farmer to let you stay on his open land for a night or two.

Most of the boondockers find it hard to find an appropriate place to park their RVs for free.

Finding the Fresh Water

Just imagine you turned on the tap while traveling on RV and suffering from water scarcity later on.

Ahh, I can’t even imagine that. Another immense hardship that you may suffer while planning to boondock in the center of nowhere is freshwater availability.

No doubt, gallons are present in your RV, which is enough for short trips. A 5-gallon tank is enough to get sufficient drinking water for five days.

Well, that’s not enough. We’ll suggest you fill-up the water tank as you pass by any water reserve. And don’t forget to turn off the tap right after using it.

Dumping Black Water

No doubt, talking about this topic will make you feel nasty, but we’ve to discuss it as it is also one of the hardest things to do while you’re on your trip on RV.

Mostly, the black water comes from your toilet cassette. If you have an RV, you are probably able to drain it with a sewage drain hose.

Almost no one wants to engage himself in this most challenging task, but everyone has to do it as you can’t keep it with you always.

Try to stop by the public toilets or use the sewage dumping places or gas stations that you come across while traveling on the road.

Treatment of Rubbish

Living with the smell of rubbish or trash can destroy your plans to enjoy the fresh air for which you’re searching. Doubtlessly there is rubbish where there’s almost any type of human activity.

Another frustrating thing about going boondocking is to dispose of the garbage you have collected in your RV.

So don’t compromise on your hygiene and comfort just because of rubbish. Try to dispose of it as much as you can.

When you’re looking for a perfect place to park your RV, you may pass by many public places where there are facilities to dispose of the rubbish. So do that and keep your RV clean.

Managing Laundry

As obviously, you can’t take your whole wardrobe with you when you’re traveling. Most of the traveling people prefer to take only the necessary clothes with them.

But you’ve got to wash them at least for the sake of hygiene. Living in an area away from the city may bewilder you about the laundry systems.

Moreover, you can’t carry your washing machine too. So how can you tackle the problem of laundry and drying your clothes?

I’ll suggest you utilize your water tank but only in the case if you’re nearby a water station so that you can refill it afterward.

There is usually a laundromat in a nearby city or town if it is needed.

Dealing With Gray Water

Did you say RV? I heard it as a second home! With all the bathroom, shower, and kitchen opportunities, it’s the best choice for going on boondocking.

But wait what to do with greywater? It’s the water stored in the tank of your RV after coming from the bathroom sink, shower, and kitchen. You’ve got to drop it off or dump it too!

You can’t dump the water from your RV at public places or openly in the vast lands for the sake of pollution and environment conservation.

This problem is also blowing the minds of some people. But don’t worry; you’ll come to know the places to dump off the gray water if you continue boondocking.

Some of the best places to dump gray water are parks and camping grounds.

Travel Now!

As we already mentioned, hardships lead to easiness. So don’t bother yourself by thinking about these hardships while going for boondocking.

Try to solve them by making necessary arrangements and enjoy your travel life to the fullest.

Dean

I bought my first camping trailer in 1972 and since then I have owned several different types of RVs from pickup campers to Class A & B motor homes as well as several different size camping trailers.

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